Kick Ketosis Off Your Farm!

FREE online webinar

April 28 @ 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

 Join Westpoint Farm Vets, Kingshay & Elanco Animal Health for a FREE online meeting about understanding the risk levels and reducing the impact of ketosis on your farm. 

Wednesday 28th April at 1.30 – 2.30pm

The webinar will cover:

  • transition period successes and failures
  • the effects of ketosis on milk, colostrum quality, fertility, health and the resulting cost implications
  • ‘SOFT’ cows to focus on
  • body condition scoring
  • managing the dry cow period
  • fresh cow checks
  • key performance indicators to measure and monitor

There will be opportunities throughout the meeting to ask questions.

Click here to register for the meeting. You will be emailed the joining instructions for the Zoom meeting before 28th April.



The Impact of ketosis - article by Elanco, makers of Kexxtoneâ„¢

The transition period is a time of great risk for many diseases in the dairy cow, with 75% of disease occurring during this preiod (1) therefore it's a time of great opportunity for welfare and productivity.

The cost of a case of ketosis is up to £220 (2) this is due to loses associated with:


Health

  • Increased culling risk (2)
  • Increased metritis, DAs, mastitis

Fertility

  • 50% less chance to get pregnant to 1st AI(4)
  • Or 22 days more open (4)
  • Increase in cystic cows (2)

Production
  • 358kg less milk produced (3)

Reducing ketosis on farm could save the above losses and decrease the therapeutic antibiotic use by 20-25% (5)

Ask your vet today about how you can reduce the impact of ketosis on your farm. Or find out more at www.farmanimalhealth.co.uk


References

1. Major Advances in Disease Prevention in Dairy Cattle, S J LeBlanc, K D Lissemore, D F Kelton, T F Duffield, K E Leslie. American Dairy Science Association 2006.

2. Raboisson et al (2015). The economic impact of subclinical ketosis at the farm level: Tackling the challenge of over-estimation due to multiple interactions. Prev Vet Med 1;122(4):417-25.

3. Ospina P. A., Nydam D.V. et al. Association between the proportion of sampled transition cows with increased nonesterified fatty acids and βhydroxybutyrate and disease incidence, pregnancy rate, and milk production at the herd level Journal of Dairy Science 2010;93: 3595-3601.

4. Walsh R.B., Walton J. S. et al. The effect of subclinical ketosis in early lactation on reproductive performance of postpartum dairy cows J. Dairy Sci. 2007;90: 2788-2796.

5. How Metabolic Diseases Impact the Use of Antimicrobials:A Formal Demonstration in the Field of Veterinary Medicine Didier Raboisson1 *, Maxime Barbier1 , Elise Maigné2 PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/ journal.pone.0164200 October 7, 2016.


Posted by Alison Eves
25th March 2021

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